Tuesday, June 15, 2010

The Mayo Clinic Diet--For real!




For years there's been bogus Mayo Clinic diets (MCD) floating around the internet and office water coolers. To quote a 2005 Medical Edge newsletter. “Versions of a Mayo Clinic Diet have been circulating for decades. Most push grapefruit, eggs, cabbage soup or meat and promise dramatic weight loss. None of these diets is associated with or has been endorsed by Mayo Clinic.”

Well, guess what? There is now an official Mayo Clinic Diet and it's a book, not anything xeroxed and posted on your Aunty LuLu's fridge. There's also a journal to help you with your changing lifestyle-goals.

I checked it out and I think it's an excellent plan. The diet is really about lifestyle changes, which I like, not about wacky diets or food combinations, which make me cringe! The book is divided into 3 parts: The Lose It! section, which asks you if you're ready for change, a critical part of making any lifelong change stick. From there it goes over the 5 habits to start, 5 to break and 5 brownie-point habits to ensure you actually do Lose It! The Lose It section kick starts your initial weight loss. Part two is the Live It! section, which helps you beyond the first two week Lose it! period. You'll start to develop life long changes to continue with your weight loss and then maintain your weight. Lastly, part 3 covers the "extra stuff." Among the many topics, there's info on behavioral changes, making meals easy, and how to burn even more calories.

Now the Mayo Clinic is a hospital and they work with the morbidly obese. This book is designed to help those folks. But even if you don't tilt the scale at 300+ lbs the Mayo Clinic Diet can help those of us who want to shed a few pounds, want to eat a more balanced diet, or just learn more about what exactly we're shoving in our pie holes.

So many diet books are written to appeal to the attention-deficient crowd out there who want instant results. Guess what? All those books are based on drastically reduced calorie diets. But after a few weeks of just eating cabbage soup or oil-packed tuna, eventually you're gonna want something else to eat. You binge, and bing! you're back where you started. Am I right?

I could comfortably recommend this book to my clients. I'd also suggest Weight Watchers (WW). Both are about portions and making conscious decisions, and most importantly, making exercise and healthy food choices a lifestyle. The difference between WW and the MCD is MCD has a food pyramid around which that they want you to base your daily intake. On Weight Watchers, if you want to spend your points on those Krispy Kreme donuts, that's your choice. Regarding the food pyramid, the MCD food pyramid is not the same as the USDA's, but close. Personally, I like the Harvard School of Public Health's food pyramid the most.

So, there you go! Let me know what you think...

3 comments:

Betty Lou said...

So, there you go! Let me know what you think...

I think you make good sense.

Meredith said...

I might want to check that book out. Having some good success with WW online. It is really more about being in control of food rather than letting it control you. Sounds so simple but really getting it is the biggest deal!

I love your new blog layout!

kristin said...

Hey Meredith! Check it out. Let me know how it goes. And thanks, Betty Lou.

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